Review: Soldiers:A Soldier’s Story by Allen Cross and Arius de Winter

Product description from Amazon:

Soldier – This is the story of a soldier finding himself in the time of battle, falling in love and not being able to express it. This is the story of how soldiers live, of how we, soldiers, fall in love, how the battle field opens the character to express things he never would, and except himself before death finds him. It is a story of odds, moral code and in the end………..?

This book is filled with sexual situations, gay illustrations, sex and one on one sexual situations. Cum join us as these soldiers find something more in the foxhole then war.

As a former soldier who found himself in battle, in love, and in a fox hole, I was blighted by the hopes that might never come, the question ‘why now, why did I find you now” and meeting death face to face. These are the expressions of hope, valor and the human side of love that can be found even in a time of war.

These are the real stories of men in battle, some fictionalized, some up-beat romance added but still the real thing, hope, valor and glory.

Review by Gerry Burnie

This short story should be dishonourably discharged from your reading list

Note: Readers should be aware that under the Kindle format, which does not specify either word or page count, some publishers are marketing short stories (some as short as a 30-minute read) with no notice that these are not novellas or full scale novels.

“Soldier: A Soldier’s Story” by Allen Cross [Amazon Digital Services] is one such example. The complete text of this slapdash effort can be read in about an hour—provided that one has an hour to waste.

The plot, such as it is, is set during WWII in the Pacific Corridor; although that can only be deduced from references to “Japs” and an “island.” The narrator Jack, a soldier, is stationed there and is befriend by two others, Matt and Simon, in the shower. Apart from the fact that Matt has a “full ten inch cock” there is very little description of these two to help the reader get a picture of them. However, “He [Matt] was clean shaved, [sic] cock, balls and all.”

The narrative and dialogue at this point are much along the same lines, i.e.

“Dude,” you ok. [sic]

I felt sick.

He [sic] was this hot guy standing in front of my [sic] with a fucking hard on and I wasn’t supposed to be looking at him like a love lost child. I’d lost total control and now, here my cock was shower dancing with his.

I thought I would explode right there on the spot.

“Hey dude, don’t worry about it, happens all the time”. [sic]

I wasn’t sure what he meant, that his cock was hard or that his and mine were touching?

Matt smiled as he looked down at my cock embrace [sic] with his. He just looked up at me and smiled.

“Hey you fucker, I’m Simon”, the man next to Matt announced. You two dick dancing or can I join.

And so forth.

As a sort of blanket caveat (apology, perhaps), the author is careful to point out that this is an “un-edited proof”—which begs at least a couple of questions: e.g. If the writing isn’t complete, why publish it? and, Does this author not realize that by publishing such shoddy workmanship he is indirectly sullying the image of every other writer who has paid good money to have his or her manuscript(s) edited? And in this regard I include Amazon Digital Services and every other publisher who markets this type of inferior pulp.

The plot then goes on to gloss over the feeble attempt at a storyline by mixing in lots of explicit, homoerotic sex. However even this is poorly handled in places. For example, the author writes that “Matt sat up, reached for my cock and began to suck my dick as I moaned softly,” but approximately two pages later, he writes, “I desperately wanted his body and his long hard cock but he was so good looking that I wasn’t sure he’d reject me or ask of me more than I was willing to give.” [Emphasis mine]. Rejection? Not two pages beforehand the guy was copping on the narrator’s dick, so it is a pretty fair bet that rejection isn’t overly likely.

Although the hype for this story strongly suggest that this is “…the story of how soldiers live, of how we, soldiers, fall in love, how the battle field opens the character to express things he never would, and except himself before death finds him” I found very few references to army life apart from some superficial, generic situations that told me almost nothing about what it was like. I do know, however, that if soldiers had copulated as openly as these are written to have done, being court-martialled would have been the least of their worries. One-half star.

Another short story of the same ilk is: “Missing Jackson Hole” by Ryan Field [Loveyoudivine Alterotica, 2010]. 149K. This story can be read in about 30 minutes; however, one must buy and download it to discover this.

Buy from Kindle

3 Responses

  1. Unfortunate. The idea for the story is really a good one (I had a similar idea some time ago. A WWII men in foxholes love story is in the story ideas folder on my hard drive) but after reading a number of typos in the blurb alone I figured that the storywouldn’t be worth reading.

  2. This story is reassuring and at the same time worrying.

    If this tripe can get itself published, surely I can write something publishable….

  3. If anyone is under the impression that MISSING JACKSON’S HOLE is being marketed as anything other than a short story stand alone, I sincerely apologize. I work hard to get this info out on my personal blog and in social networks.

    Though authors and publishers don’t always have control over how books and stories are sold on all web sites, most e-book web sites do, in fact, mention word counts and lengths.

    ARe, for example, lists this info for MISSING JACKSON’S HOLE Missing Jackson’s Hole, and it’s clearly stated this is a 5,000 word short story.
    By: Ryan Field | Other books by Ryan Field
    Published By: loveyoudivine
    Published: Sep 03, 2010
    ISBN # 9781600545399
    Word Count: 5,392

    http://www.fictionwise.com/ebooks/b113765/Missing-Jacksons-Hole/Ryan-Field/?si=0

    And on fictionwise.com MISSING JACKSON’S HOLE is listed, very clearly, as a 15-21 minute read. http://www.fictionwise.com/ebooks/b113765/Missing-Jacksons-Hole/Ryan-Field/?si=0
    Heat Index

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